The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms

In the fourth edition (DSM-IV) of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health, all the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms are outlined. All of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity must have remained for at the least six months to a level that is dysfunctional and discrepant with the stages of growth in the child. Some of these symptoms are also seen in attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity.

Inattention: A Major Marker Of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms

The child frequently gives out to give close attention to particulars or does simple mistakes in schoolwork, homework, or any other activities.
The child oft has trouble in paying attention in any works or playing activities.
The child oft does not look like paying attention when spoken to directly.
The child oft does not go through on details given and does not complete homework, chores, or tasks in their workplace (this is not because of their oppositional conduct or not successful in understanding instructions).
The child oft has trouble in arranging works and activities.
The child fends off, dislikes, or is loath to engross in works that need affirmed mental attempt (like schoolwork or homework).
The child loses things needed for works or activities (like toys, school assignments, books, pencils, or tools).
The child is oft well distrait by external inputs.
The child is oft short in everyday activities.
Hyperactivity:
The child move restlessly with his/her feet or hands or wiggles in his/her seat.
The child frequently moves from his/her seat in the schoolroom or in other situations in which staying in seated is asked.
The child frequently runs or climbs up overly in conditions in which it is incompatible.
The child frequently has trouble in playing or engaging in free time activities calmly.
The child speaks overly.

Impulsivity:

The child blunders out solutions before questions have been finished.
The child has trouble in waiting for his/her chance.
The child breaks up or pokes on others (for instance, enter uninvited into conversations or games).

Some of the hyperactive, impulsive, or inattention, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms that make current trouble were there before 7 years of age and are also there in two or more scopes like at school, work or at home. There must be clean proof of substantial disability in social, academic, or occupational performance. And the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms are not wholly made by another serious physical disorder or mental disorder.

Recognizing Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a condition that generally starts in children but may be retained up to adulthood. Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is not as easy to diagnose compared to that in children because adults may have developed a coping mechanism to make up for their disorder. Due to this so called coping mechanism, adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may be misinterpreted as some other condition in adults or as something else.

Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a behavioral condition that affects not a lot of people, about three to five percent of children in the United States are said to have adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and most of these children, if not diagnosed and treated early, may bring this condition up to adulthood. The condition affects boys more often than girls, but the retention up to adulthood is even for both genders.

Symptoms Of ADHD In Adults

Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may manifest differently than the condition in children. Signs and symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are disorganization of things (both personal and work related), forgetfulness, tardiness, has anger management issues, impulsive behavior, mood swings, defiance with authority, procrastination, difficulty in following instructions, difficulty in concentration and low self esteem.

These attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms may also be accompanied by behavior such as being anti social or withdrawn from other people or crowds. On the other hand, those who suffer from adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may also be extremely outgoing and sociable to the extent that they may dislike being on their own and prefer to always have someone with them or be in a crowd. Those with adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may also manifest frustration due to not being able to concentrate or be angry with oneself or others whom he or she may perceive as the source of the intrusion on his or her concentration.

Many individuals with adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may also indulge in substance abuse or may be smokers and heavy drinkers. They also tend to have more problems with relationships, either from work or in the personal level. It is also wise to look out for signs such as driving violations and low work performance.

Treating Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can be managed and controlled with a combination of diet and behavioral therapy. Medication may be sued but it is not usually recommended unless the adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is destructive to one’s daily life.